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Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl. 2020 May;110:110677. doi: 10.1016/j.msec.2020.110677. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Design and evaluation of a biosynthesized cellulose drug releasing duraplasty.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ottawa, Canada.
2
Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Canada; Neuroscience Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada.
3
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ottawa, Canada; Neuroscience Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada.
4
Hainan Medical University, Haikou 571199, China.
5
Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Canada; Neuroscience Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada; Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Ottawa, Canada. Electronic address: etsai@toh.ca.
6
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ottawa, Canada; Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ottawa, Canada. Electronic address: xcao@eng.uOttawa.ca.

Abstract

Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a standard surgical procedure performed on stroke patients in which a portion of a skull is removed and a duraplasty membrane is applied onto the brain. While DC can significantly reduce the risk of death, it does not reverse the stroke damage. In this study, a novel biosynthesized cellulose (BC)-based drug releasing duraplasty was developed and studied. The BC duraplasty fabrication process allowed readily incorporation of growth factors (GFs) in a sterile manner and control of physical and mechanical properties of the resulting duraplasty. Our results showed that BC duraplasty containing the highest amount of dry cellulose presented swelling ratio of 496 ± 27%, Young's modulus of 0.37 ± 0.02 MPa, ultimate tensile strength of 0.96 ± 0.02 MPa, while releasing GFs for over 10 days. In addition, neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) cultures demonstrated that the GFs released from the BC duraplasty promoted NSPC proliferation and differentiation in vitro. Finally, animal studies revealed that the BC duraplasty did not cause any inflammatory reactions after the DC procedure in vivo. In summary, this newly developed GF loaded BC membrane demonstrates a promising potential as drug releasing duraplasty, not only for stroke treatments but also for traumatic brain injuries and spinal cord injuries.

KEYWORDS:

Biosynthesized cellulose; Drug delivery; NSPC; Nerve regeneration; Stroke

PMID:
32204106
DOI:
10.1016/j.msec.2020.110677

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of competing interest The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

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