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Br J Cancer. 2020 Mar 17. doi: 10.1038/s41416-020-0789-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Female reproductive factors and the risk of lung cancer in postmenopausal women: a nationwide cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine and Supportive Care Centre, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Family Medicine and Supportive Care Centre, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. dwshin.md@gmail.com.
3
Department of Digital Health, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Science and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea. dwshin.md@gmail.com.
4
Department of Medical Statistics, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. hkd917@naver.com.
5
Department of Medical Statistics, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
6
Department of Economics and Centre for Economic and Social Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, USA.
7
Department of Nutrition Epidemiology, TH Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Reproductive factors and hormone use in postmenopausal women have been hypothesised to affect the risk of developing lung cancer, but the epidemiological evidence is inconsistent.

METHODS:

Using the Korean National Health Insurance System database, we identified 4,775,398 postmenopausal women older than 40 years who had undergone both cardiovascular health- and cancer screening between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2014. Information about reproductive factors was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. The risk of lung cancer was estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models.

RESULTS:

During a median follow-up of 4.4 years, 16,556 women (15,223 non-smokers) were diagnosed with lung cancer. The risk of lung cancer was not significantly influenced by early menarche age (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.03 for menarche ≥18 vs. ≤14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-1.09) or late age at menopause (aHR 1.02 for menopause ≥55 vs. <40; 95% CI, 0.91-1.14). Furthermore, the number of children, duration of breastfeeding and use of hormone replacement therapy were not associated with the risk of lung cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

No statistically significant association was found between reproductive factors and the risk of lung cancer in postmenopausal Korean women.

PMID:
32203211
DOI:
10.1038/s41416-020-0789-7

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