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Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2020 Mar-Apr;38(2):337-342. Epub 2020 Mar 22.

COVID-19, cytokines and immunosuppression: what can we learn from severe acute respiratory syndrome?

Author information

1
Rheumatology Unit, ASST-Fatebenefratelli L. Sacco University Hospital, University of Milan, Italy. piercarlo.sarziputtini@gmail.com.
2
Rheumatology Unit, ASST-Fatebenefratelli L. Sacco University Hospital, University of Milan, Italy.
3
Rheumatology Unit, ATS Sardegna, P. Dettori Hospital, Tempio Pausania, Italy.
4
Gastrointestinal Unit, ASST-Fatebenefratelli Sacco. L. Sacco Department of Biochemical and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Italy.
5
Department of Infectious Diseases, I Division of Infectious Diseases ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Milan, Italy.
6
Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences 'Luigi Sacco', University of Milan, and III Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Luigi Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

A severe outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged in China in December 2019, and spread so rapidly that more than 200,000 cases have so far been reported worldwide; on January 30, 2020, the WHO declared it the sixth public health emergency of international concern. The two previously reported coronavirus epidemics (severe acute respiratory syndrome [SARS] and Middle East respiratory syndrome [MERS]) share similar pathogenetic, epidemiological and clinical features as COVID-19. As little is currently known about SARS-CoV-2, it is likely that lessons learned from these major epidemics can be applied to the new pandemic, including the use of novel immunosuppressive drugs.

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PMID:
32202240
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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