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Aging Clin Exp Res. 2020 Mar 21. doi: 10.1007/s40520-020-01528-w. [Epub ahead of print]

Potential functional benefits of a comprehensive evaluation of physical activity for aging adults: a CLSA cross-sectional analysis.

Author information

1
Faculty of Health, Dalhouise University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
2
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada.
3
Cardiometabolic Exercise & Lifestyle Laboratory, Fredericton, NB, Canada.
4
New Brunswick Institute for Research Data and Training (NB-IRDT), University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada.
5
Department of Family Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada.
6
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada. Danielle.bouchard@unb.ca.
7
Cardiometabolic Exercise & Lifestyle Laboratory, Fredericton, NB, Canada. Danielle.bouchard@unb.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Physical activity recommendations for aging adults do not account for possible benefits of light-intensity physical activity on physical function. The purpose of this study was to assess if a sum of all physical activities (regardless of intensity) related to physical function for aging adults, independent of physical activity guidelines.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study was conducted with baseline data of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA n = 25,072) including ages from 45 to 85. Physical activity was collected via the Physical Activity Scale for Elderly questionnaire. The sum of all activities, based on the Metabolic Equivalent of a Task (MET), was called Total Index. Physical function was derived from objective measures. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis based on the specific age and sex median values of physical function.

RESULTS:

The Total Index was associated with being in the lowest median of physical function when adjusted for the physical activity guidelines and other potential confounders (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.01-1.03, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

This study suggests that components of physical activity not currently included in current guidelines may be associated with better physical function outcomes for aging adults.

KEYWORDS:

CLSA; Epidemiology; Exercise; Health; Human aging

PMID:
32200499
DOI:
10.1007/s40520-020-01528-w

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