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Hum Brain Mapp. 2020 Mar 21. doi: 10.1002/hbm.24988. [Epub ahead of print]

Subcortical shape alterations in major depressive disorder: Findings from the ENIGMA major depressive disorder working group.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry & Weill Institute for Neurosciences, San Francisco, California, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
5
Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne & Melbourne Health, Melbourne, Australia.
6
Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia.
7
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medicine Greifswald, Germany.
8
German Centre of Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) site Greifswald/Rostock, Germany.
9
Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Medicine Greifswald, Germany.
10
Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Germany.
11
Department of Psychiatry, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
12
Department of Psychiatry, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
13
Department of Psychiatry, Philipps-University Marburg, Germany.
14
Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, VU University Medical Center, GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
15
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
16
Division of Mind and Brain Research, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy CCM, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany.
17
McLean Hospital and Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Belmont, Massachusetts, USA.
18
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Neuroscience, Groningen, The Netherlands.
19
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Interdisciplinary Center Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation (ICPE), Groningen, The Netherlands.
20
Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, South Africa.
21
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tuebingen, Germany.
22
Department of Psychiatry, University Tuebingen, Germany.
23
Imaging Genetics Center, Mark & Mary Stevens Neuroimaging & Informatics Institute, Keck USC School of Medicine, California, USA.
24
Department of Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute, Tuebingen, Germany.
25
Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

Alterations in regional subcortical brain volumes have been investigated as part of the efforts of an international consortium, ENIGMA, to identify reliable neural correlates of major depressive disorder (MDD). Given that subcortical structures are comprised of distinct subfields, we sought to build significantly from prior work by precisely mapping localized MDD-related differences in subcortical regions using shape analysis. In this meta-analysis of subcortical shape from the ENIGMA-MDD working group, we compared 1,781 patients with MDD and 2,953 healthy controls (CTL) on individual measures of shape metrics (thickness and surface area) on the surface of seven bilateral subcortical structures: nucleus accumbens, amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, pallidum, putamen, and thalamus. Harmonized data processing and statistical analyses were conducted locally at each site, and findings were aggregated by meta-analysis. Relative to CTL, patients with adolescent-onset MDD (≤ 21 years) had lower thickness and surface area of the subiculum, cornu ammonis (CA) 1 of the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (Cohen's d = -0.164 to -0.180). Relative to first-episode MDD, recurrent MDD patients had lower thickness and surface area in the CA1 of the hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala (Cohen's d = -0.173 to -0.184). Our results suggest that previously reported MDD-associated volumetric differences may be localized to specific subfields of these structures that have been shown to be sensitive to the effects of stress, with important implications for mapping treatments to patients based on specific neural targets and key clinical features.

KEYWORDS:

ENIGMA; amygdala; hippocampus; major depressive disorder (MDD); nucleus accumbens; shape analysis

PMID:
32198905
DOI:
10.1002/hbm.24988

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