Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Rev Mal Respir. 2020 Mar 17. pii: S0761-8425(20)30026-7. doi: 10.1016/j.rmr.2019.08.008. [Epub ahead of print]

[How to reduce lung cancer mortality among people living with HIV?]

[Article in French]

Author information

1
GRC n°04, Theranoscan, faculté de médecine P&M Curie, Sorbonne université, hôpital Tenon (AP-HP), 4, rue de la Chine, 75252 Paris, France; Service de pneumologie, unité de tabacologie, hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. Electronic address: anne-marie.ruppert@aphp.fr.
2
GRC n°04, Theranoscan, faculté de médecine P&M Curie, Sorbonne université, hôpital Tenon (AP-HP), 4, rue de la Chine, 75252 Paris, France; Service de pneumologie, unité de tabacologie, hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.
3
Département des maladies infectieuses et unité, InsermU1175, université et CHU de Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
4
Unité de coordination de tabacologie, CHU de Caen, Caen, France.

Abstract

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death among people living with HIV (PLHIV). Tobacco exposure is higher among PLHIV (38.5%) and mainly explains the increased risk of lung cancer. To reduce lung cancer mortality, two approaches need to be implemented: lung cancer screening with low-dose thoracic CT scan and smoking cessation. Low dose CT scan is feasible in PLHIV. The false positive rate is not higher than in the general population, except for cases with CD4 <200/mm3. The impact on survival remains to be assessed. Despite the high prevalence, smoking cessation research among PLHIV is scarce. Very low quality data from 11 studies showed that more intensive smoking cessation interventions were effective in achieving short-term abstinence. A single randomized phase 3 trial showed the superiority of varenicline compared to placebo in long-term smoking cessation. The maximum benefit of reducing lung cancer mortality should be obtained by combining smoking cessation and lung cancer screening.

KEYWORDS:

4 CB; Dépistage; HIV; Lung cancer; Screening; Tabac; Tobacco; VIH

PMID:
32197931
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmr.2019.08.008

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center