Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2020 Mar 7;88:104042. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2020.104042. [Epub ahead of print]

Higher extracellular water-to-total body water ratio more strongly reflects the locomotive syndrome risk and frailty than sarcopenia.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan; Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Konan Kosei Hospital, Konan, Japan.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
3
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Konan Kosei Hospital, Konan, Japan.
4
Department of Rehabilitation, Kansai University of Welfare Science, Osaka, Japan.
5
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. Electronic address: imagama@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Among body composition parameters measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, the extracellular water-to-total body water (ECW/TBW) ratio is a known prognostic or related factor for various diseases. While concepts such as locomotive syndrome risk, frailty, and sarcopenia are gaining popularity in Japan, their relationship with the ECW/TBW ratio has not been examined in detail. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between them.

METHODS:

Of 1081 individuals who underwent health checkups, 550 were included in this study. The evaluations included a two-step test, stand-up test, and a 25-question geriatric locomotive function scale questionnaire. Frailty was diagnosed based on the Japanese version of the Cardiovascular Health Study criteria. Sarcopenia was evaluated according to the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia criteria. The aforementioned ratio was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis.

RESULTS:

The ECW/TBW ratio significantly increased with locomotive syndrome risk, frailty, and sarcopenia (p < 0.001 each). Nevertheless, no significant difference was found between robust and pre-frailty groups (p = 0.71) and normal and pre-sarcopenia groups (p = 0.93). Furthermore, after correcting for age, sex, and body mass index, multiple regression analysis revealed that locomotive syndrome risk (p < 0.001) and frailty (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with an increase in the ECW/TBW ratio, whereas sarcopenia was not (p = 0.97).

CONCLUSIONS:

An increase in the ECW/TBW ratio may reflect locomotive syndrome risk and frailty, but not sarcopenia. In bioelectric impedance analysis, this ratio is an important indicator; if it is high, it is necessary to consider locomotive syndrome risk and frailty.

KEYWORDS:

Bioelectrical impedance analysis; Extracellular water; Frailty; Locomotive syndrome risk; Sarcopenia

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of Competing Interest None.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center