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J Microbiol Immunol Infect. 2020 Apr;53(2):191-208. doi: 10.1016/j.jmii.2020.02.002. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Recommendations and guidelines for the treatment of Clostridioides difficile infection in Taiwan.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.
3
Division of Infectious Diseases, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.
4
Departments of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
5
Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan.
6
Division of Infectious Diseases, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan.
7
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, China Medical University Children's Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
8
Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.
9
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
11
Division of General Medicine, Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
12
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
13
Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Children's Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
14
Division of General Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
15
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
16
Department of Medical Education and Research, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
17
Department of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
18
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: ssjlee28@yahoo.com.tw.
19
Division of Infectious Diseases, Taipei Medical University Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is a major enteric disease associated with antibiotic use and a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. This is the first guideline for treatment of CDI in Taiwan, aiming to optimize medical care for patients with CDI. The target audience of this document includes all healthcare personnel who are involved in the medical care of patients with CDI. The 2018 Guidelines Recommendations for Evidence-based Antimicrobial agents use in Taiwan (GREAT) working group was formed, comprising of infectious disease specialists from 13 medical centers in Taiwan, to review the evidence and draft recommendations using the grading of recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation (GRADE) methodology. A nationwide expert panel reviewed the recommendations during a consensus meeting in March 2019. The recommendation is endorsed by the Infectious Diseases Society of Taiwan (IDST). This guideline describes the epidemiology and risk factors of CDI, and provides recommendations for treatment of CDI in both adults and children. Recommendations for treatment of the first episode of CDI, first recurrence, second and subsequent recurrences of CDI, severe CDI, fulminant CDI, and pediatric CDI are provided.

KEYWORDS:

CDI; Clostridium difficile; Diarrhea; Infectious diarrhea

PMID:
32169531
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmii.2020.02.002
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Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of Competing Interest All authors declare no conflict of interest.

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