Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz. 2020 Apr;63(4):439-451. doi: 10.1007/s00103-020-03108-9.

[Assessment of self-reported cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in the German National Cohort (GNC, NAKO Gesundheitsstudie): methods and initial results].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Forschergruppe Molekulare Epidemiologie, Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft (MDC), Robert-Rössle-Straße 10, 13125, Berlin, Deutschland. lina.jaeschke@mdc-berlin.de.
2
Forschergruppe Molekulare Epidemiologie, Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft (MDC), Robert-Rössle-Straße 10, 13125, Berlin, Deutschland.
3
Abteilung Epidemiologie von Krebserkrankungen, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Deutschland.
4
Institut für Community Medicine, Universitätsmedizin Greifswald, Greifswald, Deutschland.
5
Partnerstandort Greifswald, Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf-Forschung (DZHK), Greifswald, Deutschland.
6
Klinikum Westfalen, Knappschaftskrankenhaus Dortmund, Dortmund, Deutschland.
7
Lehrstuhl für Epidemiologie, am UNIKA-T, LMU München, Augsburg, Deutschland.
8
SFG Klinische Epidemiologie, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Deutschland.
9
Leibniz-Institut für Präventionsforschung und Epidemiologie - BIPS, Bremen, Deutschland.
10
Institut für Statistik, Universität Bremen, Bremen, Deutschland.
11
Institut für Medizinische Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Deutschland.
12
Institut für Epidemiologie und Sozialmedizin, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Münster, Deutschland.
13
Institut für Krebsepidemiologie an der Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck, Deutschland.
14
Abteilung Klinische Epidemiologie und Alternsforschung, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Deutschland.
15
Abteilung Epidemiologie, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (HZI), Braunschweig, Deutschland.
16
Institut für Epidemiologie und Präventivmedizin, Universität Regensburg, Regensburg, Deutschland.
17
Institut für Prävention und Tumorepidemiologie, Universitätsklinikum Freiburg, Medizinische Fakultät, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Freiburg, Deutschland.
18
Zentrale Einrichtung NAKO-Studienzentrum, Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung (DIfE), Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Deutschland.
19
Krebsregister Saarland, Saarbrücken, Deutschland.
20
Institut für Medizinische Epidemiologie, Biometrie und Informatik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Deutschland.
21
Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (MHH), Hannover, Deutschland.
22
Institut für Sozialmedizin, Epidemiologie und Gesundheitsökonomie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Deutschland.
23
Institut für Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Deutsches Diabetes-Zentrum (DDZ), Leibniz-Zentrum für Diabetes-Forschung an der Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Deutschland.
24
Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Deutschland.
25
Institut für Epidemiologie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, Kiel, Deutschland.
26
Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Statistik und Epidemiologie (IMISE), Medizinische Fakultät, Universität Leipzig, Leipzig, Deutschland.
27
Institut für Epidemiologie, Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt, Neuherberg, Deutschland.
28
IUF Leibniz-Institut für umweltmedizinische Forschung gGmbH, Düsseldorf, Deutschland.
29
Standort Greifswald, Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung (DZD), Greifswald, Deutschland.
30
Abteilung Molekulare Epidemiologie, Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung (DIfE), Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Deutschland.
31
Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Deutschland.
32
Partnerstandort Berlin, Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf-Forschung (DZHK), Berlin, Deutschland.
33
MDC/BIH Biobank, Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft (MDC) und Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), Berlin, Deutschland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Data on self-reported cardiovascular and metabolic diseases are available for the first 100,000 participants of the population-based German National Cohort (GNC, NAKO Gesundheitsstudie).

OBJECTIVES:

To describe assessment methods and the frequency of self-reported cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in the German National Cohort.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Using a computer-based, standardized personal interview, 101,806 participants (20-75 years, 46% men) from 18 nationwide study centres were asked to use a predefined list to report medical conditions ever diagnosed by a physician, including cardiovascular or metabolic diseases. For the latter, we calculated sex-stratified relative frequencies and compared these with reference data.

RESULTS:

With regard to cardiovascular diseases, 3.5% of men and 0.8% of women reported to have ever been diagnosed with a myocardial infarction, 4.8% and 1.5% with angina pectoris, 3.5% and 2.5% with heart failure, 10.1% and 10.4% with cardiac arrhythmia, 2.7% and 1.8% with claudicatio intermittens, and 34.6% and 27.0% with arterial hypertension. The frequencies of self-reported diagnosed metabolic diseases were 8.1% and 5.8% for diabetes mellitus, 28.6% and 24.5% for hyperlipidaemia, 7.9% and 2.4% for gout, and 10.1% and 34.3% for thyroid diseases. Observed disease frequencies were lower than reference data for Germany.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the German National Cohort, self-reported cardiovascular and metabolic diseases diagnosed by a physician are assessed from all participants, therefore representing a data source for future cardio-metabolic research in this cohort.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort; Cross-sectional study; Epidemiology; Germany; Observational study

PMID:
32157352
DOI:
10.1007/s00103-020-03108-9

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center