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mSystems. 2020 Mar 10;5(2). pii: e00891-19. doi: 10.1128/mSystems.00891-19.

Reply to Kenyon, "Are Differences in the Oral Microbiome Due to Ancestry or Socioeconomics?"

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
2
Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.
3
Rowland Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
4
International Epidemiology Field Station, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Rockville, Maryland, USA.
5
Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
6
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
7
Department of Biostatistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
8
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA jirong.long@vanderbilt.edu.

KEYWORDS:

host-microbial interaction; oral microbiome

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