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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2020 Feb 27. pii: S0735-1097(20)34332-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2020.02.036. [Epub ahead of print]

Olive Oil Consumption and Cardiovascular Risk in U.S. Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: mguasch@hsph.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.
3
Department of Nutrition, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Human Nutrition Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, IISPV (Institut d'Investigació Sanitària Pere Virgili), Rovira i Virgili University, Reus, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn, Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
6
Department of Nutrition, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn, Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; University of Navarra, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Pamplona, Spain.
7
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
8
Department of Nutrition, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
9
Department of Nutrition, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Olive oil intake has been associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Mediterranean populations, but little is known about these associations in the U.S population.

OBJECTIVES:

To examine whether olive oil intake is associated with total CVD, coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke risk.

METHODS:

We included 61,181 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1990-2014) and 31,797 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1990-2014) who were free of cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline. Diet was assessed using food frequency questionnaires at baseline and then every 4 years. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).

RESULTS:

During 24 years of follow-up, we documented 9,797 incident cases of CVD, including 6,034 CHD cases and 3,802 stroke cases. After adjusting for major diet and lifestyle factors, compared with non-consumers, those with higher olive oil intake (>1/2 tablespoon/d or >7g/d) had 14% lower risk of CVD [pooled HR (95% CI): 0.86 (0.79, 0.94)] and 18% lower risk of CHD [pooled HR (95% CI): 0.82 (0.73, 0.91)]. No significant associations were observed for total or ischemic stroke. Replacing 5g/d of margarine, butter, mayonnaise, or dairy fat with the equivalent amount of olive oil was associated with 5-7% lower risk of total CVD and CHD. No significant associations were observed when olive oil was compared with other plant oils combined. In a subset of participants, higher olive oil intake was associated with lower levels of circulating inflammatory biomarkers and a better lipid profile.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher olive oil intake was associated with lower risk of CHD and total CVD in two large prospective cohorts of U.S. men and women. The substitution of margarine, butter, mayonnaise, and dairy fat with olive oil could lead to lower risk of CHD and CVD.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular Disease; Coronary Heart Disease; Olive Oil; Plant Oils; Stroke

PMID:
32147453
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2020.02.036

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