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Med Teach. 2020 Mar 4:1-10. doi: 10.1080/0142159X.2020.1732316. [Epub ahead of print]

Training junior faculty to become clinical teachers: The value of personalized coaching.

Author information

1
Department of General Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.
2
Faculty of Medicine, Unit of Development and Research in Medical Education (UDREM), University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
3
Institute of Primary Care, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.
4
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.
6
Division of Primary Care Medicine, Department of Primary Care Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.
7
Department of community medicine and primary care, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

Background: Junior clinical faculty require institutional support in the acquisition of feedback and clinical supervision skills of trainees. We tested the effectiveness of a personalized coaching versus guided self-reflection format of a faculty development program at improving faculty skills and self-efficacy.Methods: Participants were evaluated both before and after the program using a four-station Objective Structured Teaching Exercise (OSTE). A gain-score analysis, one-way ANOVA, and paired t-tests were used to evaluate both groups. The impact on the learning environment was measured by resident ratings of the Maastricht Clinical Teaching Questionnaire.Results: One hundred and twenty-seven participants completed the study over a three-year period. Both groups had significant improvements in self-efficacy. Participants in the coaching group demonstrated superior performance in encouraging learner self-reflection, teaching effectiveness, verifying learner understanding, exploring feelings/needs, and defining learning objectives. Over a 5-year period, the overall institutional learning climate significantly improved concerning faculty role-modeling, coaching, articulation, and explorations skills.Conclusion: Offering a contextualized faculty-development program using OSTEs that provides multiple opportunities for feedback and is focused on creating a community of practice is an effective method to facilitate the transfer of skills to the clinical environment, supports teacher identity development, and favorably impacts the learning climate.

KEYWORDS:

Graduate medical education; clinical competence; coaching; medical residency

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