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Neurol India. 2020 Jan-Feb;68(1):54-60. doi: 10.4103/0028-3886.279701.

Endoscopic Endonasal Optic Nerve Decompression with Durotomy: Pis Aller in the Mind of a Blind.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.
2
Department of Neuro-otology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.
3
Department of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.
4
Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.
5
Department of Ophthalmology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Abstract

Background:

Progressive vision loss is a dismal sequelae of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and secondary intracranial hypertension with cerebro-venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). The initial management revolves around weight loss, acetazolamide, steroids, and diuretics. A subset of unfortunate patients, refractory to medical therapy, need surgical intervention in the form of CSF diversion or optic nerve decompression (OND). The ONDd is an emerging alternative with encouraging early results.

Aim:

In our study, we share our experience of ONDd by endoscopic endonasal corridor, highlighting the technical nuances of procedure and discuss the indications of the same in the era of advanced technology.

Materials and Methods:

A retrospective, noncomparative review of the medical records of all the patients of IIH (ICHD-III criteria) with severe vision loss, refractory to medical treatment, and with established objective evidence of papilledema was done. All the patients were operated in our department by endoscopic endonasal sheath fenestration.

Results:

Nine patients (M:F 3:6) underwent endoscopic endonasal optic nerve decompression (2016-2019) approach for medically refractive IIH (n = 6) and CVST (n = 3). The mean age of population was 21.44 ± 5.14 years; 6 patients had improvement in headache and 6 had improvement in visual acuity. The visual acuity deteriorated in two patients (n = 1 IIH and n = 1 CVST with dural AVF). One patient needed postoperative lumbar drain for CSF leak, while none had meningitis.

Conclusion:

Endoscopic optic nerve sheath fenestration is minimally invasive and effective alternative with promising outcome in the management of medical refractory IIH or CVST.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebro-venous sinus thrombosis; idiopathic intracranial hypertension; optic nerve decompression

PMID:
32129244
DOI:
10.4103/0028-3886.279701

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