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J Autism Dev Disord. 2020 Feb 28. doi: 10.1007/s10803-020-04420-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Access to Dental Visits and Correlates of Preventive Dental Care in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Child and Adolescent Studies and Center for Autism, California State University, Fullerton, 800 N. State College Blvd. EC-560, Fullerton, CA, 92831, USA. rfenning@fullerton.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, The Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA. rfenning@fullerton.edu.
3
Department of Pediatrics, The Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.
5
Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Dentistry, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.
7
Department of Child and Adolescent Studies and Center for Autism, California State University, Fullerton, 800 N. State College Blvd. EC-560, Fullerton, CA, 92831, USA.
8
Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Department of Developmental/Behavioral Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.
10
Simons Foundation, New York, NY, USA.
11
Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Dental care received by children in the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network (ATN) was compared to National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) data for children without special healthcare needs and children with parent-reported ASD. Correlates of obtained preventive dental services were examined within the ATN sample. Participants included 375 families of children ages 4 to 17 enrolled in the ATN. ATN families reported levels of preventive dental care that were similar to, or exceeded, NSCH-reported care. However, disparities in obtained preventive dental services emerged within the ATN sample. Lower intellectual functioning was the most consistent correlate of reduced access to and completion of preventive dental care. Implications for developing system-wide supports and targeted interventions are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD); Dental care; Intellectual functioning; Preventive care

PMID:
32112232
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-020-04420-8

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