Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Vet Intern Med. 2020 Mar;34(2):669-677. doi: 10.1111/jvim.15742. Epub 2020 Feb 26.

Differentiation of lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteropathy and small cell lymphoma in cats using histology-guided mass spectrometry.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Epidemiology, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, California.
2
Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
3
Long Island University CVM, Brookville, New York.
4
Texas Veterinary Pathology, LLC, San Antonio, Texas.
5
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
6
Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
7
Veterinary Specialty Hospital, San Diego, California.
8
Veterinary Education, Research, and Outreach Center, Texas A&M University, Canyon, Texas.
9
New River VDL, LLC, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Differentiation of lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteropathy (LPE) from small cell lymphoma (SCL) in cats can be challenging.

HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVE:

Histology-guided mass spectrometry (HGMS) is a suitable method for the differentiation of LPE from SCL in cats.

ANIMALS:

Forty-one cats with LPE and 52 cats with SCL.

METHODS:

This is a retrospective clinicopathologic study. Duodenal tissue samples of 17 cats with LPE and 22 cats with SCL were subjected to HGMS, and the acquired data were used to develop a linear discriminate analysis (LDA) machine learning algorithm. The algorithm was subsequently validated using a separate set of 24 cats with LPE and 30 cats with SCL. Cases were classified as LPE or SCL based on a consensus by an expert panel consisting of 5-7 board-certified veterinary specialists. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and clonality testing were available for all cats. The panel consensus classification served as a reference for the calculation of test performance parameters.

RESULTS:

Relative sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of HGMS were 86.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 74.5%-98.8%), 91.7% (95% CI: 80.6%-100%), and 88.9% (95% CI: 80.5%-97.3%), respectively. Comparatively, the clonality testing had a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 85.7% (95% CI: 72.8%-98.7%), 33.3% (95% CI: 14.5%-52.2%), and 61.5% (95% CI: 48.3%-74.8%) relative to the panel decision.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

Histology-guided mass spectrometry was a reliable technique for the differentiation of LPE from SCL in duodenal formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of cats and might have advantages over tests currently considered state of the art.

KEYWORDS:

HGMS; MALDI mass spectrometry; PARR; PCR for antigen receptor rearrangements; chronic enteropathy; clonality testing; feline; inflammatory bowel disease; inflammatory enteropathy; small cell lymphoma

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center