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Nature. 2020 Mar;579(7797):136-140. doi: 10.1038/s41586-020-2034-1. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Gene expression and cell identity controlled by anaphase-promoting complex.

Author information

1
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA.
2
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA.
3
Berkeley Lights, Emeryville, CA, USA.
4
Department of Molecular Machines and Signaling, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany.
5
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
6
Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
7
Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, CA, USA.
8
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA. mrape@berkeley.edu.
9
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA. mrape@berkeley.edu.

Abstract

Metazoan development requires the robust proliferation of progenitor cells, the identities of which are established by tightly controlled transcriptional networks1. As gene expression is globally inhibited during mitosis, the transcriptional programs that define cell identity must be restarted in each cell cycle2-5 but how this is accomplished is poorly understood. Here we identify a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism that integrates gene expression with cell division to preserve cell identity. We found that WDR5 and TBP, which bind active interphase promoters6,7, recruit the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) to specific transcription start sites during mitosis. This allows APC/C to decorate histones with ubiquitin chains branched at Lys11 and Lys48 (K11/K48-branched ubiquitin chains) that recruit p97 (also known as VCP) and the proteasome, which ensures the rapid expression of pluripotency genes in the next cell cycle. Mitotic exit and the re-initiation of transcription are thus controlled by a single regulator (APC/C), which provides a robust mechanism for maintaining cell identity throughout cell division.

PMID:
32076268
DOI:
10.1038/s41586-020-2034-1

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