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J Health Organ Manag. 2020 Feb 20;ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print):0. doi: 10.1108/JHOM-04-2018-0107.

Simulation educators in clinical work: the manager's perspective.

Author information

1
Institution for Medicine and Health, Linkopings Universitet, Linkoping, Sweden.
2
Clinical Skills Centre, Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
3
Department of Clinical Science Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Simulation Centre West, Department of Research, Education and Development, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden.
5
The Södersjukhuset Hospital and Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Metodikum - Skill Centre of Medical Simulation, Region County Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden.
7
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (Sunderbyn), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
8
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
9
Clinical Skills Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Information is scarce on healthcare managers' understanding of simulation educators' impact on clinical work. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore healthcare managers' perceptions of the significance of clinically active simulation educators for the organisation.

DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH:

Healthcare managers were invited to be interviewed in a semi-structured manner. Inductive thematic analysis was used to identify and analyse patterns of notions describing the managers' perceptions of simulation educators' impact as co-workers on their healthcare organisations.

FINDINGS:

The identified relevant themes for the healthcare unit were: (1) value for the manager, (2) value for the community and (3) boundaries. Simulation educators were perceived to be valuable gatekeepers of evidence-based knowledge and partners in leadership for educational issues. Their most prominent value for the community was establishing a reflective climate, facilitating open communication and thereby improving the efficacy of teamwork. Local tradition, economy, logistics and staffing of the unit during simulation training were suggested to have possible negative impacts on simulation educators' work.

PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS:

The findings might have implications for the implementation and support of simulation training programs.

SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

Healthcare managers appreciated both the personal value of simulation educators and the effect of their work for their own unit. Local values were prioritised versus global. Simulation training was valued as an educational tool for continual professional development, although during the interviews, the managers did not indicate the importance of employment of pedagogically competent and experienced staff.

ORIGINALITY/VALUE:

The study provided new insights about how simulation educators as team members affect clinical practice.

KEYWORDS:

Community of practice; Continuing medical education; Organisational learning; Patient safety; Patient simulation; Teamwork

PMID:
32073806
DOI:
10.1108/JHOM-04-2018-0107

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