Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Med. 2020 Feb 12;9(2). pii: E499. doi: 10.3390/jcm9020499.

Evaluating the Performance of the WHO International Reference Standard for Osteoporosis Diagnosis in Postmenopausal Women of Varied Polygenic Score and Race.

Wu Q1,2, Xiao X1,2, Xu Y1,2.

Author information

1
Nevada Institute of Personalized Medicine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.
2
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Whether the bone mineral density (BMD) T-score performs differently in osteoporosis classification in women of different genetic profiling and race background remains unclear.

METHODS:

The genomic data in the Women's Health Initiative study was analyzed (n = 2417). The polygenic score (PGS) was calculated from 63 BMD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for each participant. The World Health Organization's (WHO) definition of osteoporosis (BMD T-score ≤-2.5) was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of fracture.

RESULTS:

T-score classification significantly underestimated the risk of major osteoporotic fracture (MOF) in the WHI study. An enormous underestimation was observed in African American women (POR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.30-0.83) and in women with low PGS (predicted/observed ratio [POR]: 0.43, 95% CI: 0.28-0.64). Compared to Caucasian women, African American, African Indian, and Hispanic women respectively had a 59%, 41%, and 55% lower hazard of MOF after the T-score was adjusted for. The results were similar when used for any fractures.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study suggested the BMD T-score performance varies significantly by race in postmenopausal women.

KEYWORDS:

bone mineral density (BMD); polygenic score (PGS); single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center