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Neurobiol Aging. 2020 Mar;87:108-114. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2019.12.002. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Determinants of mesial temporal lobe volume loss in older individuals with preserved cognition: a longitudinal PET amyloid study.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Thônex, Switzerland; Department of Psychiatry, University of Geneva, Thônex, Switzerland.
2
Department of Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Thônex, Switzerland. Electronic address: francois.herrmann@hcuge.ch.
3
Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Diagnostic Department, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Geneva, Thônex, Switzerland; Medical Direction, University of Geneva Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.
5
CIRD - Centre d'Imagerie Rive Droite, Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Neuroradiology, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

Mesial temporal lobe (MTL) is prominently affected in normal aging and associated with neurodegeneration in AD. Whether or not MTL atrophy is dependent on increasing amyloid load before the emergence of cognitive deficits is still disputed. We performed a 4.5-year longitudinal study in 75 older community dwellers (48 women, mean age: 79.3 years) including magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and follow-up, positron emission tomography amyloid during follow-up, neuropsychological assessment at 18 and 55 months, and APOE genotyping. Linear regression models were used to identify predictors of the MTL volume loss. Amyloid load was negatively associated with bilateral MTL volume at baseline explaining almost 10.5% of its variability. In multivariate models including time of follow-up and demographic variables (older age, male gender), this percentage exceeded 35%. The APOE4 allele independently contributed another 6%. Cognitive changes had a modest but still significant negative association with MTL volume loss. Our data support a multifactorial model including amyloid deposition, older age, male gender, APOE4 allele, and slight decline of cognitive abilities as independent predictors of MTL volume loss in brain aging.

KEYWORDS:

APOE; Amyloid load; Cognitive changes; Mesial temporal lobe; Normal aging; Structural MRI

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