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Pediatr Res. 1988 Dec;24(6):728-34.

The concentration of the 35-kDa surfactant apoprotein in amniotic fluid from normal and diabetic pregnancies.

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1
Cecil H. and Ida Green Center for Reproductive Biology Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas 75235.

Abstract

A specific, enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay was used to determine the concentration of the 35,000 mol wt surfactant apoprotein (SP-A) in samples of amniotic fluid obtained from nondiabetic (n = 358) and diabetic (n = 29) women. The enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay was performed with rabbit antibodies directed against SP-A present in lavage fluid from a patient with alveolar proteinosis. Amniotic fluid SP-A concentrations increased as a function of gestational age, from less than 3 micrograms/ml at 30-31 wk to 24 micrograms/ml at 40-41 wk, and were positively correlated with the lecithin to sphingomyelin ratio (p less than 0.01). SP-A concentrations also increased as a function of gestational age in shake test positive samples (p less than 0.05), but were unchanged in shake test-negative samples. There was no difference in the surfactant apoprotein concentration of male compared with female fetuses at any gestational age. In amniotic fluid obtained from 20 diabetic women, SP-A levels were significantly less than in nondiabetic pregnancies that were matched for gestational age and sex of the fetus (p less than 0.05). The SP-A concentrations in amniotic fluids obtained from nine women who were diabetic and hypertensive and from 10 hypertensive women were not different from matched controls. The relationships described above were valid whether the SP-A concentration was expressed per mg protein or per ml amniotic fluid. These data are suggestive that the concentration of amniotic fluid SP-A is decreased in diabetic pregnancies.

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