Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2020 Feb 12. doi: 10.1007/s00406-020-01104-3. [Epub ahead of print]

The resting-state functional connectivity of amygdala subregions associated with post-traumatic stress symptom and sleep quality in trauma survivors.

Wang Z1,2, Zhu H1,3,4, Yuan M1, Li Y1, Qiu C1, Ren Z1,5, Yuan C1, Lui S6, Gong Q6, Zhang W7.

Author information

1
Mental Health Center and Psychiatric Laboratory, The State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
2
Sichuan Provincial Center for Mental Healthy, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences and Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu, China.
3
Huaxi Brain Research Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.
5
Department of Clinical Psychology, Southwest Hospital, Army Medical University (The Third Military Medical University), Chongqing, China.
6
Huaxi MR Research Center (HMRRC), Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China.
7
Mental Health Center and Psychiatric Laboratory, The State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China. weizhanghx@163.com.

Abstract

Neuroimaging findings suggest that the amygdala plays a primary role in both the psychopathology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and poor sleep quality, which are common in trauma survivors. However, the neural mechanisms of these two problems in trauma survivors associated with amygdala remain unclear. In the current study, we aimed to explore the role of functional connectivity of amygdala subregions in both PTSD symptoms and poor sleep quality. A total of 94 trauma-exposed subjects were scanned on a 3T MR system using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Both Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale scores were negatively correlated with the resting-state functional connectivity between the left basolateral amygdala-left medial prefrontal cortex and the right basolateral amygdala-right medial prefrontal cortex. Our findings suggest a shared amygdala subregional neural circuitry underlying the neuropathological mechanisms of PTSD symptoms and poor sleep quality in trauma survivors.

KEYWORDS:

Amygdala subregions; Functional connectivity; PTSD; Sleep; Trauma-exposed

PMID:
32052123
DOI:
10.1007/s00406-020-01104-3

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center