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Sci Rep. 2020 Feb 12;10(1):2441. doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-59032-0.

Prospective Cohort study of Predictors of Follow-Up Diagnostic Colonoscopy from a Pragmatic Trial of FIT Screening.

Author information

1
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, 3800 N. Interstate Avenue, Portland, OR, 97227, USA. Elizabeth.O'Connor@kpchr.org.
2
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, 3800 N. Interstate Avenue, Portland, OR, 97227, USA.
3
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, 1730 Minor Avenue, Suite 1600, Seattle, WA, 98101, USA.

Abstract

The goal of this study was to explore diagnostic colonoscopy completion in adults with abnormal screening fecal immunochemical test (FIT) results. This was a secondary analysis of the Strategies and Opportunities to Stop Colon Cancer in Priority Populations (Stop CRC) study, a cluster-randomized pragmatic trial to increase uptake of CRC screening in federally qualified community health clinics. Diagnostic colonoscopy completion and reasons for non-completion were ascertained through a manual review of electronic health records, and completion was compared across a wide range of individual patient health and sociodemographic characteristics. Among 2,018 adults with an abnormal FIT result, 1066 (52.8%) completed a follow-up colonoscopy within 12 months. Completion was generally similar across a wide range of participant subpopulations; however, completion was higher for participants who were younger, Hispanic, Spanish-speaking, and had zero or one of the Charlson medical comorbidities, compared to their counterparts. Neighborhood-level predictors were not associated with diagnostic colonoscopy completion. Thus, completion of a diagnostic colonoscopy was relatively low in a large sample of community health clinic adults who had an abnormal screening FIT result. While completion was generally similar across a wide range of characteristics, younger, healthier, Hispanic participants tended to have a higher likelihood of completion.

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