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Trials. 2020 Feb 12;21(1):176. doi: 10.1186/s13063-020-4111-z.

Add-on effect of kinesiotape in patients with acute lateral ankle sprain: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, DongShin University, Naju City, 58245, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, DongShin University, Naju City, 58245, Republic of Korea. nahonga@hanmail.net.
3
Clinical Research Center, DongShin University Gwangju Korean Medicine Hospital, 141, Wolsan-ro, Nam-gu, Gwangju City, 61619, Republic of Korea. nahonga@hanmail.net.
4
Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, KyungHee University, Seoul, 02447, Republic of Korea.
5
Clinical Research Center, DongShin University Gwangju Korean Medicine Hospital, 141, Wolsan-ro, Nam-gu, Gwangju City, 61619, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Nursing, Christian College of Nursing, Gwangju City, 61662, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Evidence for the add-on effect of kinesiotape (KT) with acupuncture for treating ankle sprains remains insufficient. We assessed the add-on effect of KT on ankle sprains by comparing acupuncture combined with KT (AcuKT) with acupuncture alone in patients with acute lateral ankle sprain (ALAS).

METHODS:

This study was a multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial that included a per-protocol analysis of the add-on effect of KT on ALAS. The randomization was software based and only the assessors were blinded. Sixty participants (20 each from three centers) with grade I or II ALAS were randomly assigned to acupuncture (n = 30) or AcuKT (n = 30) groups. Both groups received acupuncture treatment once daily, 5 days per week for 1 week. The AcuKT group received additional KT treatment. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain and the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) were obtained, and edema measurements were performed at baseline (week 0), at the end of the intervention (week 1), and at 4 weeks after intervention (week 5). The European Quality of Life Five Dimension-Five Level Scale (EQ-5D-5 L) measurements were conducted at week 0, week 1, week 5, and week 26 after the intervention. The number of recurrent ankle sprains was determined at 4, 8, 12 and 26 weeks after the intervention.

RESULTS:

Fifty-six patients with ALAS completed the trial (AcuKT group, n = 27; acupuncture group, n = 29). There were significant changes in visual analog scale score (AcuKT, P < 0.001; acupuncture, P < 0.001), the FAOS (AcuKT, P < 0.001; acupuncture, P < 0.001), and EQ-5D-5 L measurements (AcuKT, P < 0.001; acupuncture, P < 0.001) within both groups. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of any outcome or in a subanalysis based on symptom severity.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results indicate that AcuKT did not show a positive add-on effect of KT with acupuncture in terms of pain reduction, edema, recovery of function, activities of daily living, quality of life or relapse of ALAS.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Clinical Research Information Service (cris.nih.go.kr), KCT0002257. Registered on 27 February 2017.

KEYWORDS:

Acupuncture; Ankle sprain; Kinesiotape; Randomized controlled trial

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