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Acad Pediatr. 2020 Feb 7. pii: S1876-2859(20)30055-3. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2020.02.001. [Epub ahead of print]

Children with Facial Burns Treated in United States Emergency Departments, 2000-2018.

Author information

1
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH; Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH.
2
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH.
3
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH; The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Columbus, OH.
4
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH; The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Columbus, OH; Child Injury Prevention Alliance, Columbus, OH. Electronic address: gary.smith@nationwidechildrens.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the characteristics and trends of facial burns among children.

METHODS:

Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database were retrospectively analyzed for children <20 years old treated in United States (US) emergency departments (EDs) from 2000-2018 and national facial burn estimates were calculated.

RESULTS:

During 2000-2018, there were an estimated 203,180 children <20 years old treated in US EDs for facial burns, averaging 10,694 burns or 130 burns per million children annually. Boys accounted for 66.4% of cases, and 41.9% were patients <5 years old. The most common type of burn was thermal (51.9%), followed by scalds (30.7%). The two most common injury mechanisms were light/lit (22.0%) and spilled/splashed (15.1%). Fuels and fuel burning equipment (13.1%) were most commonly associated with burns. Overall, the number of facial burns decreased significantly by 53.1% during the 19-year study period with 6,525 cases treated in 2018. Although the number of thermal and radiation burns decreased significantly by 69.6% and 63.5%, respectively, the number of scald burns remained relatively constant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the number of children treated in US EDs for facial burns decreased significantly from 2000-2018, these injuries remain common. Contrary to the observed decline in thermal and radiation burns, scald burns did not demonstrate a significant temporal trend. These findings indicate a need for increased prevention efforts, especially focused on scalds. Because the type of burn, mechanisms involved, and consumer products associated with facial burns vary by age group, prevention strategies should be developmentally tailored.

KEYWORDS:

burns; emergency care; injury; scald; trauma

PMID:
32044467
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2020.02.001

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