Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Med Entomol. 2020 Feb 11. pii: tjaa005. doi: 10.1093/jme/tjaa005. [Epub ahead of print]

Sugar Feeding Patterns for Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes in South Texas.

Author information

1
Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.
2
Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.
3
Department of Entomology, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Weslaco, TX.

Abstract

Effective mosquito surveillance and management depend on a thorough understanding of the biology and feeding patterns unique to species and sex. Given that a propensity to sugar feed is necessary for some mosquito surveillance and newer control strategies, we sought to document the amount of total sugar in wild Aedes aegypti (L.) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) captured from five different locations in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of South Texas over 2 yr. We used Biogents Sentinel 2 (BGS2) traps in year 1 and aspirators, BGS2, and CDC resting traps in years 2 and 3 to collect adult mosquitoes. The hot anthrone test was used to quantify total sugar content in each mosquito. Additionally, the cold and hot anthrone tests were used to distinguish fructose content from total sugars for mosquitoes captured in 2019. Overall, Ae. aegypti females had significantly lower total sugar content than Ae. aegypti males as well as both sexes of Cx. quinquefasciatus. However, the percentage of Ae. aegypti positive for fructose consumption was four to eightfold higher than Ae. aegypti previously reported in other regions. The difference between locations was significant for males of both species, but not for females. Seasonality and trapping method also revealed significant differences in sugar content of captured mosquitoes. Our results reinforce that sugar feeding in female Ae. aegypti is less than Cx. quinquefasciatus, although not absent. This study provides necessary data to evaluate the potential effectiveness of sugar baits in surveillance and control of both Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

KEYWORDS:

Aedes ; Culex ; collection method; sugar-feeding; surveillance

PMID:
32043525
DOI:
10.1093/jme/tjaa005

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center