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Public Health Action. 2019 Dec 21;9(4):153-158. doi: 10.5588/pha.19.0038.

Integrated and patient-selected care facilitates completion of isoniazid preventive therapy in Eswatini.

Author information

1
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA.
2
University Research Co, Mbabane, Eswatini.
3
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA.
4
Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, Hanover, NH, USA.

Abstract

in English, French, Spanish

Setting:

Five human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care facilities in Eswatini.

Objective:

To identify critical factors that enabled persons living with HIV to successfully complete a 6-month course of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) provided through a choice of facility-based or community-based delivery, coordinated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) refills.

Design:

This was a mixed methods, retrospective cross-sectional study.

Results:

Between June and October 2017, we interviewed 150 participants who had completed IPT in the previous year. Fourteen participants did not recall being offered a choice, and were excluded from the analysis. Of the remaining 136, 56.6% were female and 64.7% chose facility-based care; the median age was 42.5 years. Most participants reported that having a choice was important to their treatment completion (87.7%) and that linking IPT and ART refills facilitated undergoing IPT (98.5%). Participants were knowledgeable about the benefits of IPT and valued the education received from their providers. Participants also reported a high rate of IPT disclosure (95%) to friends and family members.

Conclusion:

Offering patients a choice of IPT delivery, linking IPT with ART refills, emphasizing patient education and engagement with healthcare workers, and supporting disclosure of IPT are critical factors to enabling IPT completion. These interventions should be incorporated throughout Eswatini and in similar high tuberculosis and HIV burden settings.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; IPT; tuberculosis

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