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BMJ Open. 2020 Feb 9;10(2):e033181. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033181.

Retrospective qualitative study evaluating the application of IG4 curriculum: an adaptable concept for holistic surgical education.

Author information

1
King's College London - Strand Campus, London, UK.
2
Women's Health Research Unit, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK msideris@nhs.net.
3
Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK.
4
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athinon, Greece.
5
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
6
Renal Transplant Directorate, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK.
7
Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK.
8
Harvard Medical School GHSM, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
9
European University Cyprus, Nicosia, Nicosia, Cyprus.
10
Experimental Educational and Research Centre ELPEN, Athens, Greece.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Faced with a costly and demanding learning curve of surgical skills acquisition, the growing necessity for improved surgical curricula has now become irrefutable. We took this opportunity to formulate a teaching framework with the capacity to provide holistic surgical education at the undergraduate level.

SETTING:

Data collection was conducted in all the relevant healthcare centres the participants worked in. Where this was not possible, interviews were held in quiet public places.

PARTICIPANTS:

We performed an in-depth retrospective evaluation of a proposed curriculum, through semi-structured interviews with 10 participants. A targeted sampling technique was employed in order to identify senior academics with specialist knowledge in surgical education. Recruitment was ceased on reaching data saturation after which thematic data analysis was performed using NVivo 11.

RESULTS:

Thematic analysis yielded a total of 4 main themes and 29 daughter nodes. Majority of study participants agreed that the current landscape of basic surgical education is deficient at multiple levels. While simulation cannot replace surgical skills acquisition taking place in operating rooms, it can be catalytic in the transition of students to postgraduate training. Our study concluded that a standardised format of surgical teaching is essential, and that the Integrated Generation 4 (IG4) framework provides an excellent starting point.

CONCLUSIONS:

Through expert opinion, IG4 has been validated for its capacity to effectively accommodate learning in a safer and more efficacious environment. Moreover, we support that through dissemination of IG4, we can instil a sense of motivation to students as well as develop robust data sets, which will be amenable to data analysis through the application of more sophisticated methodologies.

KEYWORDS:

adult surgery; medical education & training; surgery

PMID:
32041855
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033181
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Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: None declared.

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