Format

Send to

Choose Destination
CNS Spectr. 2020 Feb 11:1-8. doi: 10.1017/S1092852919001706. [Epub ahead of print]

Habitual versus affective motivations in obsessive-compulsive disorder and alcohol use disorder.

Author information

1
Obsessive, Compulsive, and Anxiety Spectrum Research Program, Institute of Psychiatry of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2
Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University, Victoria,Australia.
3
Substance Abuse Research Program, Institute of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
4
D'Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE.:

To (1) confirm whether the Habit, Reward, and Fear Scale is able to generate a 3-factor solution in a population of obsessive-compulsive disorder and alcohol use disorder (AUD) patients; (2) compare these clinical groups in their habit, reward, and fear motivations; and (3) investigate whether homogenous subgroups can be identified to resolve heterogeneity within and across disorders based on the motivations driving ritualistic and drinking behaviors.

METHODS.:

One hundred and thirty-four obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 76) or AUD (n = 58) patients were assessed with a battery of scales including the Habit, Reward, and Fear Scale, the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, the Alcohol Dependence Scale, the Behavioral Inhibition/Activation System Scale, and the Urgency, (lack of ) Premeditation, (lack of ) Perseverance, Sensation Seeking, and Positive Urgency Impulsive Behavior Scale.

RESULTS.:

A 3-factor solution reflecting habit, reward, and fear subscores explained 56.6% of the total variance of the Habit, Reward, and Fear Scale. Although the habit and fear subscores were significantly higher in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and the reward subscores were significantly greater in AUD patients, a cluster analysis identified that the 3 clusters were each characterized by differing proportions of OCD and AUD patients.

CONCLUSIONS.:

While affective (reward- and fear-driven) and nonaffective (habitual) motivations for repetitive behaviors seem dissociable from each other, it is possible to identify subgroups in a transdiagnostic manner based on motivations that do not match perfectly motivations that usually described in OCD and AUD patients.

KEYWORDS:

Assessment; alcohol use disorder.; habit; motivations; obsessive-compulsive disorder

PMID:
32041677
DOI:
10.1017/S1092852919001706

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press
Loading ...
Support Center