Format

Send to

Choose Destination
World Neurosurg. 2020 Jan 31. pii: S1878-8750(20)30191-1. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2020.01.173. [Epub ahead of print]

Pre-residency publication productivity of U.S. neurosurgery interns.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; Medical Scientist Training Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Electronic address: duy.phan@yale.edu.
2
Harvard-MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
6
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
7
Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Research experience is believed to be an important component of the neurosurgery residency application process. One measure of research productivity is publication volume. The pre-residency publication volume of US neurosurgery interns and any potential association between applicant publication volume and the match results of top ranked residency programs has not been well-characterized.

OBJECTIVE:

In this study, we sought to characterize the pre-residency publication volume of U.S. neurosurgery residents in the 2018-2019 intern class using the Scopus database.

METHODS:

For each intern, we recorded the total number of publications, total number of first or last author publications, total number of neuroscience-related publications, mean number of citations per publication, and mean impact factor of the journal per publication. Pre-residency publication volumes of interns at the top 25 programs (based on a composite ranking score according to four different ranking metrics) were compared to those at all other programs.

RESULTS:

We found that 82% of neurosurgery interns included in the analysis (190 interns from 95 programs) had at least one publication. The average number of publications per intern among all programs was 6 ± 0.63 (mean ± SEM). We also found that interns at top-25 neurosurgery residency programs tended to have a higher number of publications (8.3 ± 1.2 vs 4.8 ± 0.7, P = 0.0137), number of neuroscience-related publications (6.8 ± 1.1 vs 4.1 ± 0.7, P = 0.0419), and mean number of citations per publication (9.8 ± 1.7 vs 5.7 ± 0.8, P = 0.0267) compared to interns at all other programs.

CONCLUSION:

Our results provide a general estimate of the pre-residency publication volume of U.S. neurosurgery interns and suggest a potential association between publication volume and matching into top-25 neurosurgery residency programs.

KEYWORDS:

Medical Education; Neurosurgery; Publications; Residency; Surgery

PMID:
32014543
DOI:
10.1016/j.wneu.2020.01.173

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center