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J Cutan Aesthet Surg. 2019 Oct-Dec;12(4):223-226. doi: 10.4103/JCAS.JCAS_99_18.

Autologous Fat Graft for Soft Tissue Camouflage in Craniofacial Microsomia.

Author information

1
Associate Professor, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India.
2
Professor, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India.
3
Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India.
4
Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India.

Abstract

Introduction:

In India, a large majority of patients with craniofacial microsomia are unable to undergo complex reconstructions owing to unaffordability, lack of access to good craniofacial centers, or reluctance of parents to accept the surgical risk. There is also considerable social stigma attached to the resultant facial scars of surgery, especially in a girl child. Hence, we have explored autologous fat graft transfer as a "stand-alone" reconstructive option for soft tissue camouflage and aesthetic correction of facial deformity in unilateral craniofacial microsomia of Pruzansky-Kaban Grades I and II.

Materials and Methods:

Twelve patients who were seeking aesthetic correction of facial deformity in unilateral craniofacial microsomia of Pruzansky-Kaban Grades I and II, and who had adequate fat in the preferred donor sites of lower abdomen and antero-medial thighs, were selected. Patients with Grade III deformity, facial palsy, and previous skeletal surgeries were excluded. Autologous fat harvesting was done with the standardized Coleman's technique and injected after decantation. Volumetric augmentation was assessed by clinical comparison with normal side for facial symmetry, skin pinch thickness at four reference points, and by two-dimensional analysis of pre- and postoperative standardized photographs at periodic intervals.

Results and Analysis:

Eleven of our patients were female and one was a male (N = 12). In each session, 20-40mL (mean 28.75 ± standard deviation [SD] 5.69) fat was aspirated and 12-35mL (mean 23.67 ± SD 6.07) fat was injected. The average operating time was 35min (mean 32.91 ± SD 4.05). Majority of our patients needed three sessions (mean 2.8 ± SD 1.03) of serial fat injections to achieve bilateral facial symmetry. Increase in skin pinch thickness was 6.4167 ± 1.31 mm. The mean patient satisfaction score was 8.83 ± SD .717.

Conclusion:

Based on our results, we conclude that autologous fat transfer, when used for soft tissue camouflage, is a versatile, easy, effective, and inexpensive method for obtaining consistent long-term aesthetic goals in mild to moderate cases of craniofacial microsomia.

KEYWORDS:

Autologous fat graft; craniofacial microsomia; craniofacial reconstruction; fat injection

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