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Epilepsy Behav. 2020 Jan 27;104(Pt A):106904. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2020.106904. [Epub ahead of print]

Validation of the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLCE-55 and QOLCE-16) for use by parents of young adults with childhood-onset epilepsy.

Author information

1
Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; Children's Health Research Institute, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: kpuka@uwo.ca.
2
Computer Science, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
3
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
4
Psychology, University of Toronto and Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Division of Neurology and Diagnostic Imagining, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
6
Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; Children's Health Research Institute, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada; Psychiatry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
7
Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; Children's Health Research Institute, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada; Paediatrics, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the study was to validate the parent-proxy reported Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLCE) in a sample of young adults with a history of childhood-onset epilepsy, allowing for the utilization of a consistent informant (the parent) across the youths' stages of development. The 55-item (QOLCE-55) and 16-item versions (QOLCE-16) were evaluated.

METHODS:

Data came from 134 young adults (aged 18.0 to 28.5 years) with childhood-onset epilepsy, recruited through community and tertiary care centers across Canada. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to assess the higher-order factor structure of the QOLCE. Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate internal consistency. Convergent validity was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) with the youth self-reported Quality of Life in Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLIE-31-P).

RESULTS:

The higher-order factor structure of the QOLCE-55 and QOLCE-16 demonstrated adequate fit: QOLCE-55 comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.968, Tucker-Lewis index (TLI) = 0.966; and root mean square of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.061; QOLCE-16 CFI = 0.966, TFI = 0.959, RMSEA = 0.141. Higher-order factor loadings were strong, ranging from 0.71 to 0.90. Internal consistency was excellent for the total score (αQOLCE-55 = 0.97; αQOLCE-16 = 0.93) and good-excellent for each subscale (α > 78). Convergent validity was moderate to good for the total score (ICC > 0.72) and each subscale (ICC > 0.51).

SIGNIFICANCE:

These findings provide support for the use of the QOLCE-55 and QOLCE-16 among young adults with a history of childhood-onset epilepsy. Utilizing a consistent measure and informant across the stages of development is essential to reliably evaluate change over time.

KEYWORDS:

Confirmatory factor analysis; Measurement; Pediatric; Psychometrics; Validity

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of competing interest None of the authors has any conflict of interest to disclose.

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