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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2020 Mar 1;105(3). pii: dgaa036. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgaa036.

Associations of Innate and Adaptive Immune Cell Subsets With Incident Type 2 Diabetes Risk: The MESA Study.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Larner College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.
2
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
3
Division of Nephrology and Kidney Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
4
Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.
6
Department of Biochemistry, Larner College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT.
7
Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Departments of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Services, University of Washington, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington.
8
Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
9
College of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Cell-mediated immunity is implicated in glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance. Whether the levels of innate and adaptive immune cells in peripheral blood are risk factors for incident type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains unknown. We hypothesized that the proportions of naive, memory, CD28-, Th17, and T regulatory CD4+ cells would be associated with incident T2D. In secondary analyses, we evaluated the relationships of 28 additional immune cell phenotypes with T2D.

DESIGN:

Immune cell phenotypes (n = 33) were measured by flow cytometry using cryopreserved cells collected from 1113 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) at the baseline examination (2000-2002). Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate associations of immune cell phenotypes with incident T2D over a median follow-up of 9.1 years, adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, educational status, and body mass index.

RESULTS:

Incident T2D was observed for 120 participants. None of the cell phenotypes included in the primary hypotheses were significantly associated with T2D (all P > 0.05). Among the secondary immune cells studied, a higher proportion of CD19+CD27+ B cells was associated with a reduced risk of T2D (hazard ratio: 0.72 (95% confidence interval: 0.56, 0.93), per 1-standard deviation (16%) increase). This association was no longer significant after correction for the multiple cell phenotypes tested (P > 0.0015).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that the frequencies of several subsets of monocytes, innate lymphocytes, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in circulating blood are not related to the future onset of T2D. Higher levels of CD19+CD27+ B cells may be associated with decreased T2D risk.

KEYWORDS:

T cells; biomarkers; inflammation; risk factors; type 2 diabetes

PMID:
31990975
PMCID:
PMC7049263
[Available on 2021-01-28]
DOI:
10.1210/clinem/dgaa036

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