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Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2020 Feb;35:103-108. doi: 10.1016/j.clnesp.2019.10.020. Epub 2019 Dec 5.

The effects of high doses of vitamin D on the composition of the gut microbiome of adolescent girls.

Author information

1
Nutrition and Biochemistry Department, School of Medicine, Social Development and Health Promotion Research Center, Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, Iran.
2
Genetic and Molecular Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
3
Antimicrobial Resistance Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
4
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
5
Departments of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Health, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
6
Evidence Based Care Research Center, Faculty Member of Nursing and Midwifery School, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
7
Brighton & Sussex Medical School, Division of Medical Education, Falmer, Brighton, Sussex, BN1 9PH, UK.
8
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran.
9
Metabolic Syndrome Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Science, Mashhad, Iran. Electronic address: ghayourm@mums.ac.ir.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Animal studies suggest that vitamin D can change the gut microbiome. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a high dose supplementation of vitamin D on the composition of the gut microbiome.

METHODS:

After DNA extraction, TaqMan assays were used for the quantitation of selected microbiome in the feces of 50 adolescent girls before and after vitamin D supplementation.

RESULTS:

The expression fold changes for Enterococcus, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were; 1.05, 1.20, 0.76, 0.28 and 1.50 respectively. Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillus fell by 72% (P < 0.0001) and 24% (P = 0.006) respectively, whilst Firmicutes and Bifidobacterium were increased by 1.5 (P < 0.0001), 1.2 (P < 0.0001) fold after supplementation.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggested that a high dose supplementation of vitamin D alter the human gut microbiome composition. Future studies are required for a better understanding of the mechanisms by which vitamin D affects the gut microbiome.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Inflammatory bowel disease; Microbiome; Vitamin D

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of Competing Interest The authors have no conflict of interest to disclose.

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