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J Alzheimers Dis. 2020;74(1):127-138. doi: 10.3233/JAD-190811.

Costs and Resource Use Associated with Community-Dwelling Patients with Alzheimer's Disease in Japan: Baseline Results from the Prospective Observational GERAS-J Study.

Author information

1
Mental Health and Nursing Research Team, Mental Health Promotion Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, and Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan.
3
Eli Lilly Japan K.K, Kobe, Japan.
4
Eli Lilly Australia Pty. Limited, West Ryde, Australia.
5
Eli Lilly and Company, Budapest, Hungary, EU.
6
Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
7
Geriatric Behavioral Neurology Project, New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, and The Osaki-Tajiri SKIP Center, Osaki, Japan.
8
Department of Neurology and Neurobiology of Aging, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.
9
Department of Neuropsychiatry, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.
10
ALZCLINIC TOKYO, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

As the Japanese population ages, caring for people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia is becoming a major socioeconomic issue.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the contribution of patient and caregiver costs to total societal costs associated with AD dementia.

METHODS:

Baseline data was used from the longitudinal, observational GERAS-J study. Using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score, patients routinely visiting memory clinics were stratified into three groups based on AD severity. Health care resource utilizationwas recorded using the Resource Utilization in Dementia questionnaire. Total monthly societal costs were estimated using Japan-specific unit costs of services and products (patient direct health care use, patient social care use, and informal caregiving time). Uncertainty around mean costs was estimated using bootstrapping methods.

RESULTS:

Overall, 553 community-dwelling patients withADdementia (28.3% mild[MMSE21-26], 37.8% moderate[MMSE 15-20], and 34.0% moderately severe/severe [MMSE < 14]) and their caregivers were enrolled. Patient characteristics were: mean age 80.3 years, 72.7% female, and 13.6% living alone. Caregiver characteristics were: mean age 62.1 years, 70.7% female, 78.8% living with patient, 49.0% child of patient, and 39.2% sole caregiver. Total monthly societal costs of AD dementia (Japanese yen) were: 158,454 (mild), 211,301 (moderate), and 294,224 (moderately severe/severe). Informal caregiving costs comprised over 50% of total costs.

CONCLUSION:

Baseline results of GERAS-J showed that total monthly societal costs associated with AD dementia increased with AD severity. Caregiver-related costs were the largest cost component. Interventions are needed to decrease informal costs and decrease caregiver burden.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Japan; cost and cost analysis; observational study

PMID:
31985460
DOI:
10.3233/JAD-190811

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