Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2020 Jan 24;10(1):1135. doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-57876-0.

Quality control of multiplex antibody detection in samples from large-scale surveys: the example of malaria in Haiti.

Author information

1
Department of Infection Biology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK. lvandenhoogen@tulane.edu.
2
Laboratoire National de Santé Publique, Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
3
Department of Infection Biology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
4
Centre of Statistics and Applications, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
5
Center for Applied Malaria Research and Evaluation, Tulane University School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
6
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal School of Public Health, Montreal, Canada.
7
Malaria Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
8
CDC Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
9
Ministère de la santé publique et de la population, Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Abstract

Measuring antimalarial antibodies can estimate transmission in a population. To compare outputs, standardized laboratory testing is required. Here we describe the in-country establishment and quality control (QC) of a multiplex bead assay (MBA) for three sero-surveys in Haiti. Total IgG data against 21 antigens were collected for 32,758 participants. Titration curves of hyperimmune sera were included on assay plates, assay signals underwent 5-parameter regression, and inspection of the median and interquartile range (IQR) for the y-inflection point was used to determine assay precision. The medians and IQRs were similar for Surveys 1 and 2 for most antigens, while the IQRs increased for some antigens in Survey 3. Levey-Jennings charts for selected antigens provided a pass/fail criterion for each assay plate and, of 387 assay plates, 13 (3.4%) were repeated. Individual samples failed if IgG binding to the generic glutathione-S-transferase protein was observed, with 659 (2.0%) samples failing. An additional 455 (1.4%) observations failed due to low bead numbers (<20/analyte). The final dataset included 609,438 anti-malaria IgG data points from 32,099 participants; 96.6% of all potential data points if no QC failures had occurred. The MBA can be deployed with high-throughput data collection and low inter-plate variability while ensuring data quality.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center