Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2020 Jan 24:1-6. doi: 10.1080/21645515.2020.1712937. [Epub ahead of print]

Preferences for vaccination program attributes among parents of young infants in Shanghai, China.

Author information

1
Department of Immunization Program, Shanghai Municipal Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Shanghai, China.
2
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
3
Department of Health Behavior & Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
6
Susan B. Meister Child Health Evaluation and Research Center, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Abstract

Compared to many other countries, China offers fewer pediatric vaccines. Future attempts to add mandatory vaccines may run counter to parents' preferences for shot-limiting. The aim of this study was to assess Chinese parents' preferences and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for programmatic attributes of vaccination services. Parents of young infants ≤3 months of age presenting at immunization clinics in Shanghai, China, in 2017 completed a discrete choice experiment (DCE) on vaccination program attributes: waiting time at the clinic, number of shots before 7 months, number of injections per visit, cost per visit, and location of the shot. We estimated preference utilities and WTP using logistic regression. In total, 590 completed the DCE. Caregivers expressed greater utility for less waiting time, fewer office visits, lower cost of vaccines, and fewer injections co-administered. Over the course of their child's first 6 months, parents were willing to pay 113 RMB ($17) to avoid an additional 10 minutes of waiting at each appointment (95% confidence interval [CI]: 213, 929), 474 RMB ($70) to avoid an additional office visit (95% CI: 241, 707), and 703 RMB ($104) to avoid an additional injection at each appointment (95% CI: 337, 1068). As China expands its list of publicly funded vaccines, public health officials will have to counter Chinese parents' strong preferences for limiting the total number of office visits and the number of injections administered at each visit, potentially through the use of combination vaccines.

KEYWORDS:

China; Stated preference; conjoint analysis; discrete choice experiment; vaccination

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center