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Pediatrics. 2020 Feb;145(2). pii: e20191606. doi: 10.1542/peds.2019-1606.

Long-term Puberty Suppression for a Nonbinary Teenager.

Author information

1
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2
Department of Adolescent Medicine and.
3
Departments of Paediatrics and.
4
Psychiatry.
5
Melbourne Law School, and.
6
School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
7
Children's Bioethics Centre, The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
8
Uehiro Centre for Practical Bioethics, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
9
The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
10
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; and.
11
Bioethics Center, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri jlantos@cmh.edu.

Abstract

Many transgender and gender-diverse people have a gender identity that does not conform to the binary categories of male or female; they have a nonbinary gender. Some nonbinary individuals are most comfortable with an androgynous gender expression. For those who have not yet fully progressed through puberty, puberty suppression with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists can support an androgynous appearance. Although such treatment is shown to ameliorate the gender dysphoria and serious mental health issues commonly seen in transgender and gender-diverse young people, long-term use of puberty-suppressing medications carries physical health risks and raises various ethical dilemmas. In this Ethics Rounds, we analyze a case that raised issues about prolonged pubertal suppression for a patient with a nonbinary gender.

PMID:
31974217
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2019-1606

Conflict of interest statement

POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

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