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Int J Med Educ. 2020 Jan 21;11:19-24. doi: 10.5116/ijme.5e01.f00c.

Comparison of knowledge and confidence between medical students as leaders and followers in simulated resuscitation.

Author information

1
Critical Care Medicine Unit, Division of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand.
2
Cardiology Unit, Division of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand.

Abstract

Objectives:

To compare both the knowledge and self-reported confidence levels between medical students as the team leaders and followers in shock resuscitation simulation training.

Methods:

A cross-sectional study was conducted with all fifth-year medical students participating in a shock resuscitation simulation-based training between May 2017 and March 2018. The simulation class was a 3-hour session that consisted of 4 shock type scenarios as well as a post-training debriefing. Medical students were assigned into groups of 4-5 members, in which they freely selected a leader, and the rest filled the roles of followers. Of 139 medical students, 32 students were leaders. A 10-question pre-test and post-test determined knowledge assessment. At the end of the class, the students completed a 5-point Likert scale confidence level evaluation questionnaire. A t-test was applied to compare knowledge scores and confidence levels between the leaders and followers.

Results:

At the end of the class, the knowledge scores between the leaders (M=6.72, SD=1.51) and followers (M=6.93, SD=1.26) were not different (t(137)= -0.81, p=0.42). In addition, the student confidence levels were also similar between the leaders (M=3.63, SD=0.55) and followers (M=3.41, SD=0.64) after training (t(137)=1.70, p=0.09).

Conclusions:

The knowledge and confidence levels were not different between either the leaders or followers in simulated resuscitation. With time-limit simulation training, we suggested every student may not need to fulfil the leadership role, but a well-designed course and constructive debriefing are recommended. Future studies should evaluate skills and longitudinal effects of the leader role.

KEYWORDS:

follower; leader; simulation; training

PMID:
31971916
DOI:
10.5116/ijme.5e01.f00c
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