Format

Send to

Choose Destination
N Engl J Med. 2020 Jan 23;382(4):341-352. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1910434.

Teprotumumab for the Treatment of Active Thyroid Eye Disease.

Author information

1
From Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles (R.S.D., A.P.); Johannes Gutenberg University Medical Center, Mainz (G.J.K.), and University Hospital Essen, Essen (A.E.) - both in Germany; Horizon Therapeutics, Lake Forest, IL (S.S., E.H.Z.T., R.P., J.W.S., T.V., R.J.H.); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis (J.C.F., B.T.F.); University of Pisa, Pisa (C.M., M.M., A.A.), and Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (M.S.) - both in Italy; Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland (R.D.); Medical College of Wisconsin Eye Institute, Milwaukee (G.J.H.); Eye Wellness Center-Neuro-Eye Clinical Trials, Houston (J.S., R.T.); Kellogg Eye Center-Michigan Medicine (C.N., T.J.S.) and University of Michigan Medical School (T.J.S.) - both in Ann Arbor; and Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami (S.W.).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Thyroid eye disease is a debilitating, disfiguring, and potentially blinding periocular condition for which no Food and Drug Administration-approved medical therapy is available. Strong evidence has implicated the insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) in the pathogenesis of this disease.

METHODS:

In a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, phase 3 multicenter trial, we assigned patients with active thyroid eye disease in a 1:1 ratio to receive intravenous infusions of the IGF-IR inhibitor teprotumumab (10 mg per kilogram of body weight for the first infusion and 20 mg per kilogram for subsequent infusions) or placebo once every 3 weeks for 21 weeks; the last trial visit for this analysis was at week 24. The primary outcome was a proptosis response (a reduction in proptosis of ≥2 mm) at week 24. Prespecified secondary outcomes at week 24 were an overall response (a reduction of ≥2 points in the Clinical Activity Score plus a reduction in proptosis of ≥2 mm), a Clinical Activity Score of 0 or 1 (indicating no or minimal inflammation), the mean change in proptosis across trial visits (from baseline through week 24), a diplopia response (a reduction in diplopia of ≥1 grade), and the mean change in overall score on the Graves' ophthalmopathy-specific quality-of-life (GO-QOL) questionnaire across trial visits (from baseline through week 24; a mean change of ≥6 points is considered clinically meaningful).

RESULTS:

A total of 41 patients were assigned to the teprotumumab group and 42 to the placebo group. At week 24, the percentage of patients with a proptosis response was higher with teprotumumab than with placebo (83% [34 patients] vs. 10% [4 patients], P<0.001), with a number needed to treat of 1.36. All secondary outcomes were significantly better with teprotumumab than with placebo, including overall response (78% of patients [32] vs. 7% [3]), Clinical Activity Score of 0 or 1 (59% [24] vs. 21% [9]), the mean change in proptosis (-2.82 mm vs. -0.54 mm), diplopia response (68% [19 of 28] vs. 29% [8 of 28]), and the mean change in GO-QOL overall score (13.79 points vs. 4.43 points) (P≤0.001 for all). Reductions in extraocular muscle, orbital fat volume, or both were observed in 6 patients in the teprotumumab group who underwent orbital imaging. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity; two serious events occurred in the teprotumumab group, of which one (an infusion reaction) led to treatment discontinuation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among patients with active thyroid eye disease, teprotumumab resulted in better outcomes with respect to proptosis, Clinical Activity Score, diplopia, and quality of life than placebo; serious adverse events were uncommon. (Funded by Horizon Therapeutics; OPTIC ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT03298867, and EudraCT number, 2017-002763-18.).

PMID:
31971679
DOI:
10.1056/NEJMoa1910434
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center