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J Neurol Sci. 2020 Jan 9;410:116677. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2020.116677. [Epub ahead of print]

Therapeutic effects of forced exercise cycling in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Radford University, Carilion Roanoke Community Hospital, 8th Floor, 101 Elm Avenue, Roanoke, VA 24013, United States of America. Electronic address: dminer1@radford.edu.
2
Department of Physical Therapy, Radford University, Carilion Roanoke Community Hospital, 8th Floor, 101 Elm Avenue, Roanoke, VA 24013, United States of America. Electronic address: aaron@radford.edu.
3
Department of Physical Therapy, Radford University, Carilion Roanoke Community Hospital, 8th Floor, 101 Elm Avenue, Roanoke, VA 24013, United States of America. Electronic address: edisalvo1@radford.edu.

Abstract

Currently there is no cure for the progressive movement disorders associated with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Pharmacological management of movement disorders in PD are associated with significant negative side effects. Exercise improves the efficacy of anti-parkinsonian medication, but does not ameliorate the side effects. Consensus on the optimal mode of exercise training or dosing to improve motor function for individuals with PD is lacking. The new concept of forced exercise is gaining traction in the literature as a mode of exercise which has the potential to improve motor function in individuals with PD. The purpose of this article is to review the effects of forced exercise on specific components of motor function that would help guide clinical decision making and exercise prescription for the PD patient population. Collectively, the evidence provided in this review suggests that forced exercise may be safely added as an ancillary therapy to the medical management of PD.

KEYWORDS:

Forced exercise; Parkinson's disease; Rehabilitation

PMID:
31954353
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2020.116677

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