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J Cancer Surviv. 2020 Jan 17. doi: 10.1007/s11764-019-00832-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Survivorship objectives in comprehensive cancer control plans: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Healthcare Delivery Research Program, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, MD, 20892-9762, USA. michelle.mollica@nih.gov.
2
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Healthcare Delivery Research Program, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, MD, 20892-9762, USA.
3
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
4
George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC, USA.
5
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Over a decade ago, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) recommended that states develop, implement, and evaluate plans that include consideration of survivorship care. The purpose of this study was to review comprehensive cancer control plans in the USA, specifically to identify the inclusion of cancer survivorship-focused goals and objectives and examine alignment of survivorship-focused objectives with the NAM recommendations.

METHODS:

Plans from 50 states, 7 territories, 5 tribal organizations, and the District of Columbia were reviewed to assess inclusion of survivorship goals and objectives. One territory plan was excluded because it did not include a survivorship-focused goal or objective (final n = 62). Objectives were assigned to domains based on NAM survivorship recommendations.

RESULTS:

Plans included between 1 and 19 survivorship-related objectives. Of the 345 survivorship objectives extracted and analyzed, the most prevalent domains addressed were raising awareness, survivorship care plans, healthcare professional capacity, and models of coordinated care. Employment-related concerns, developing and implementing quality measures, and investments in research were not frequently included in objectives.

CONCLUSIONS:

Comprehensive cancer control plans represent an important strategy that may reduce the impact of cancer and its treatment. State, territorial, and tribal coalitions can use these results to systematically focus future survivorship efforts on areas relevant to their region and population.

IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS:

The growing number of survivors requires broad-ranging policy strategies. Future efforts are needed to assess the implementation and impact of plan strategies to improve the overall wellness of cancer survivors.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Cancer control plans; National Academy of Medicine; Survivorship

PMID:
31953645
DOI:
10.1007/s11764-019-00832-3

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