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JCI Insight. 2020 Jan 16;5(1). pii: 131487. doi: 10.1172/jci.insight.131487.

Perfect timing: circadian rhythms, sleep, and immunity - an NIH workshop summary.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
2
Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
3
National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
4
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
5
Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
6
Department of Neurosciences and.
7
Department of Pathology, UCSD, La Jolla, California, USA.
8
Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
9
Human Sleep and Inflammatory Systems Laboratory, Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
10
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.
11
Center for the Study of Itch.
12
Department of Medicine.
13
Department of Anesthesiology.
14
Department of Pathology, and.
15
Department of Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
16
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
17
Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
18
Department of Psychiatry, UCSF, San Francisco, California, USA.
19
Department of Psychology and Committee on Neurobiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
20
Department, of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology, UCD School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, California, USA.
21
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
22
Division of Neonatology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
23
Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
24
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, Washington State University, Spokane, Washington, USA.
25
Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital, Columbia, Missouri, USA.
26
Department of Neurology, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, Missouri, USA.
27
Center of Emphasis in Infectious Diseases, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Health Sciences Center, Texas Tech University, El Paso, Texas, USA.
28
Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, Florida, USA.

Abstract

Recent discoveries demonstrate a critical role for circadian rhythms and sleep in immune system homeostasis. Both innate and adaptive immune responses - ranging from leukocyte mobilization, trafficking, and chemotaxis to cytokine release and T cell differentiation -are mediated in a time of day-dependent manner. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently sponsored an interdisciplinary workshop, "Sleep Insufficiency, Circadian Misalignment, and the Immune Response," to highlight new research linking sleep and circadian biology to immune function and to identify areas of high translational potential. This Review summarizes topics discussed and highlights immediate opportunities for delineating clinically relevant connections among biological rhythms, sleep, and immune regulation.

PMID:
31941836
DOI:
10.1172/jci.insight.131487
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