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J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2020 Jan 9. pii: S1553-4650(20)30035-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jmig.2020.01.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Adiposity and Endometriosis Severity and Typology.

Author information

1
Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Division of Public Health (Ms. Byun and Drs. Stanford, Allen-Brady, and Schliep).
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (Drs. Peterson and Taylor), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
3
Department of Nursing & Healthcare Leadership, University of Washington Tacoma, Tacoma (Dr. Backonja); Department of Biomedical Informatics & Medical Education, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (Dr. Backonja), Washington.
4
Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Division of Public Health (Ms. Byun and Drs. Stanford, Allen-Brady, and Schliep); Department of Internal Medicine, Genetic Epidemiology (Dr. Allen-Brady).
5
Department of Family and Consumer Studies and Population Sciences/Huntsman Cancer Institute (Dr. Smith), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
6
Dean's Office, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia (Dr. Buck Louis).
7
Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Division of Public Health (Ms. Byun and Drs. Stanford, Allen-Brady, and Schliep). Electronic address: karen.schliep@utah.edu.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

Prior research has collectively shown that endometriosis is inversely related to women's adiposity. The aim of this study was to assess whether this inverse relationship holds true by disease severity and typology.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study among women with no prior diagnosis of endometriosis.

SETTING:

Fourteen clinical centers in Salt Lake City, UT, and San Francisco, CA.

PATIENTS:

A total of 495 women (of which 473 were analyzed), aged 18-44 years, were enrolled in the operative cohort of the Endometriosis, Natural History, Diagnosis, and Outcomes (ENDO) Study.

INTERVENTIONS:

Gynecologic laparoscopy/laparotomy regardless of clinical indication.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Participants underwent anthropometric assessments, body composition measurements, and evaluations of body fat distribution ratios before surgery. Surgeons completed a standardized operative report immediately after surgery to capture revised American Society for Reproductive Medicine staging (I-IV) and typology of disease (superficial endometriosis [SE], ovarian endometrioma [OE], and deep infiltrating endometriosis [DIE]). Linear mixed models, taking into account within-clinical-center correlation, were used to generate least square means (95% confidence intervals) to assess differences in adiposity measures by endometriosis stage (no endometriosis, I-IV) and typology (no endometriosis, SE, DIE, OE, OE + DIE) adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and parity. Although most confidence intervals were wide and overlapping, 3 general impressions emerged: (1) women with incident endometriosis had the lowest anthropometric/body composition indicators compared with those without incident endometriosis, (2) women with stage I or IV endometriosis had lower indicators compared with women with stage II or III, and (3) women with OE and/or DIE tended to have the lowest indicators, whereas women with SE had the highest indicators.

CONCLUSION:

Our research highlights that the relationship between women's adiposity and endometriosis severity and typology may be more complicated than prior research indicates.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition indicators; Body mass index; Deep infiltrating endometriosis; Ovarian endometrioma; Superficial endometriosis

PMID:
31927045
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmig.2020.01.002

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