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Indian J Sex Transm Dis AIDS. 2019 Jul-Dec;40(2):139-145. doi: 10.4103/ijstd.IJSTD_54_18.

Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related discriminatory practices among health-care providers in apex health institutions of Bhubaneswar, Odisha.

Author information

1
Department of Community Medicine, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.

Abstract

Context:

Stigma and discrimination in health-care settings, against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients, not only affects patient care but also creates an unnecessary culture of secrecy and silence based on ignorance and fear.

Aims:

This study was designed to determine if there were any such discriminatory practices against people living with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by health-care providers at apex hospitals in the city of Bhubaneswar, Odisha.

Settings and Design:

A cross-sectional study was designed in clinical departments, among all doctors and paramedical workers who had been providing health services to patients with HIV/AIDS for at least a year in the three large multidisciplinary tertiary care teaching hospitals in Bhubaneswar.

Materials and Methods:

A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data through in-person interviews after obtaining informed consent.

Statistical Analysis Used:

Data were entered into Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and were analyzed using Epi Info 7 (version 7.1.2.0); results represented using frequencies, proportions, Z-tests, and Chi-square tests.

Results:

Around 76.73% of the participants agreed that they were personally aware of discrimination that occurred in health-care settings. About 92.86% of the doctors, 78.12% of the nurses, while 38.09% of other health-care providers (HCPs) agreed to the fact there were some form of discriminatory practices at health facilities; this was also found to be statistically significant. As high as 88.10% of the doctors, 90.62% of the nurses, and 80.96% of other HCPs agreed that there were discriminatory practices against HIV/AIDS patients by HCPs, although this difference was not statistically significant.

Conclusions:

Existence of discriminatory practices in these healthcare settings was due to the lack of correct information about HIV/AIDS and lack of protective materials needed for prevention of infection transmission.

KEYWORDS:

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; Human immunodeficiency virus; discrimination; health care; stigma

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