Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nutr Diet. 2020 Jan 9. doi: 10.1111/1747-0080.12605. [Epub ahead of print]

Secondary-prevention behaviour-change strategy for high-risk patients: Benefits for all classes of body mass index.

Author information

1
Nutrition & Dietetics, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
2
Nutrition and Dietetics Department, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
3
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Southport, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

AIM:

Research is needed to support the long-term benefits of lifestyle interventions for management of high-risk patients with different BMI classifications. This prospective multicentre study assessed two-year outcomes of hospital-referred patients (BMI 25-61 kg/m2 ) attending a dietitian-led multidisciplinary Healthy Eating and Lifestyle Behaviour-Change Program in group or individual formats in hospital outpatient settings.

METHODS:

Bodyweight, quality of life (Short Form-12) and intuitive eating (Intuitive Eating Scale) data were collected at pre-intervention, post-intervention and 2 years. Outcomes were reported in BMI classes.

RESULTS:

At pre-intervention (n = 493), 11% had pre-obesity, 25% obesity class I, 30% obesity class II and 34% obesity class III. Characteristics of participants with available data at post-intervention (n = 290) and 2 years (n = 178) were comparable (P > .05). Significant mean weight loss was seen at post-intervention (-2.0 ± 0.4 kg, P < .001, n = 290) and 2 years (-4.3 ± 0.5 kg, P < .001, n = 178). All BMI classes had significant weight losses (P < .05). Participants with higher obesity (classes II and III) had greater improvements in mental quality of life (P < .05) and initial weight reductions (P < .05) than those with lower classes. However, those with obesity class I had the greatest long-term weight reductions and significant improvements in physical quality of life at 2 years (P < .05). All BMI classes reported similar improvements in intuitive eating. No effect was found for differences in intervention format, duration or setting (P > .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results support dietitian-led multidisciplinary lifestyle interventions for multidisciplinary management of high-risk patients of all BMI classes.

KEYWORDS:

intuitive eating; lifestyle intervention; obesity; overweight; quality of life; weight control

PMID:
31919951
DOI:
10.1111/1747-0080.12605

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center