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Eye (Lond). 2020 Jan 9. doi: 10.1038/s41433-019-0741-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Management of nystagmus in children: a review of the literature and current practice in UK specialist services.

Author information

1
University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, UK. j.e.self@soton.ac.uk.
2
Clinical and Experimental Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. j.e.self@soton.ac.uk.
3
School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
4
Ulverscroft Eye Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.
5
Division of Ophthalmology and Orthoptics, Health Sciences School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
6
Royal Eye Infirmary, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK.
7
University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, UK.
8
Clinical and Experimental Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
9
Patient Representative, Plymouth, UK.
10
Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK.
11
National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK.
12
Eye Department, Sheffield Children's Hospital, Sheffield, UK.

Abstract

Nystagmus is an eye movement disorder characterised by abnormal, involuntary rhythmic oscillations of one or both eyes, initiated by a slow phase. It is not uncommon in the UK and regularly seen in paediatric ophthalmology and adult general/strabismus clinics. In some cases, it occurs in isolation, and in others, it occurs as part of a multisystem disorder, severe visual impairment or neurological disorder. Similarly, in some cases, visual acuity can be normal and in others can be severely degraded. Furthermore, the impact on vision goes well beyond static acuity alone, is rarely measured and may vary on a minute-to-minute, day-to-day or month-to-month basis. For these reasons, management of children with nystagmus in the UK is varied, and patients report hugely different experiences and investigations. In this review, we hope to shine a light on the current management of children with nystagmus across five specialist centres in the UK in order to present, for the first time, a consensus on investigation and clinical management.

PMID:
31919431
DOI:
10.1038/s41433-019-0741-3

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