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J Surg Res. 2020 Jan 6;249:13-17. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2019.12.017. [Epub ahead of print]

Preoperative Anxiety and Intraoperative Nociception in Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan.
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan. Electronic address: mhirose@hyo-med.ac.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Preoperative anxiety is a common psychological state in cancer patients before surgery, inducing stress responses after surgery. Associations between preoperative anxiety and intraoperative nociception, however, have not been evaluated well. In the present study, we investigated the relationship in patients with lung cancer undergoing thoracic surgery.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In this prospective study, 27 adult patients were enrolled. Intraoperative nociception during surgery was calculated as mean values of the nociceptive response (NR) throughout surgery. Associations between intraoperative nociception and preoperative patient characteristics including anxiety in addition to intraoperative variables were analyzed using univariate and multivariate regression analyses.

RESULTS:

Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that mean NR values during surgery showed a negative correlation with preoperative anxiety (β = -0.353; P = 0.041) after adjustment for body mass index, depression, and total amount of fentanyl used during surgery. Body mass index was a confounder positively associated with mean NR during surgery.

CONCLUSIONS:

Intraoperative nociception is likely associated with preoperative patient characteristics, having an inverse relationship with preoperative anxiety.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Depression; Nociception; Psychological state; Thoracic surgery

PMID:
31918325
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2019.12.017

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