Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Inj Prev. 2020 Jan 8. pii: injuryprev-2019-043352. doi: 10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043352. [Epub ahead of print]

Burden of injuries in Vietnam: emerging trends from a decade of economic achievement.

Author information

1
Department of Health Economics and Finance, Hanoi University of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
2
Department of Health Economics and Finance, Hanoi University of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam nth11@huph.edu.vn.
3
Marie Bashir Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
4
Clinical Research Unit Vietnam, University of Oxford, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
5
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
6
Institute for Global Health Innovations, Duy Tan University, Hanoi, Vietnam.
7
Center of Excellence in Behavioral Medicine, Nguyen Tat Thanh University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
8
Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
9
Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Asia Programme, Hanoi, Vietnam.
10
Department of Health Metrics Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
11
Department of Biostatistics, Hanoi University of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
12
Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.
13
Department of Health Economics, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam.
14
Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
15
Department of Clinical Hematology and Toxicology, Military Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam.
16
Faculty of Social Science, Behaviors and Health Education, Hanoi University of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vietnam has been one of the fastest-growing world economies in the past decade. The burden of injuries can be affected by economic growth given the increased exposure to causes of injury as well as decreased morbidity and mortality of those that experience injury. It is of interest to evaluate the trends in injury burden that occurred alongside Vietnam's economic growth in the past decade.

METHODS:

Results from Global Burden of Disease 2017 were obtained and reviewed. Estimates of incidence, cause-specific mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, disability-adjusted life years were analysed and reported for 30 causes of injury in Vietnam from 2007 to 2017.

RESULTS:

Between 2007 and 2017, the age-standardised incidence rate of all injuries increased by 14.6% (11.5%-18.2%), while the age-standardised mortality rate decreased by 11.6% (3.0%-20.2%). Interpersonal violence experienced the largest increase in age-standardised incidence (28.3% (17.6%-40.1%)), while exposure to forces of nature had the largest decrease in age-standardised mortality (47.1% (37.9%-54.6%)). The five leading causes of injury in both 2007 and 2017 were road injuries, falls, exposure to mechanical forces, interpersonal violence and other unintentional injuries, all of which increased in incidence from 2007 to 2017. Injury burden varied markedly by age and sex.

CONCLUSIONS:

The rapid expansions of economic growth in Vietnam as well as improvements in the Sociodemographic Index have occurred alongside dynamic patterns in injury burden. These results should be used to develop and implement prevention and treatment programme.

KEYWORDS:

burden of disease; economic development; global

PMID:
31915270
DOI:
10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043352
Free full text

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: SLJ works on a grant on influenza and RSV hospitalisations, which is funded by Sanofi Pasteur.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center