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Development. 2020 Jan 17;147(2). pii: dev180646. doi: 10.1242/dev.180646.

JNK signaling is required for proper tangential migration and laminar allocation of cortical interneurons.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA.
2
Neuroscience Graduate Program, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA.
3
Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA.
4
Biochemistry Graduate Program, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA.
5
Department of Neuroscience, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA etucker@hsc.wvu.edu.

Abstract

The precise migration of cortical interneurons is essential for the formation and function of cortical circuits, and disruptions to this key developmental process are implicated in the etiology of complex neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. We have recently identified the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway as an important mediator of cortical interneuron migration in mice, regulating the proper timing of interneuron arrival into the cortical rudiment. In the current study, we demonstrate a vital role for JNK signaling at later stages of corticogenesis, when interneurons transition from tangential to radial modes of migration. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK signaling in ex vivo slice cultures caused cortical interneurons to rapidly depart from migratory streams and prematurely enter the cortical plate. Similarly, genetic loss of JNK function led to precocious stream departure ex vivo, and stream disruption, morphological changes and abnormal allocation of cortical interneurons in vivo These data suggest that JNK signaling facilitates the tangential migration and laminar deposition of cortical interneurons, and further implicates the JNK pathway as an important regulator of cortical development.

KEYWORDS:

Development; Forebrain; GABAergic interneuron; Intracellular signaling; Mouse; Neuronal migration; Psychiatric disorder

PMID:
31915148
PMCID:
PMC6983726
[Available on 2021-01-17]
DOI:
10.1242/dev.180646

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