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Nat Rev Neurosci. 2020 Feb;21(2):93-102. doi: 10.1038/s41583-019-0255-9. Epub 2020 Jan 8.

Systemic factors as mediators of brain homeostasis, ageing and neurodegeneration.

Author information

1
Medical Scientist Training Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. johnpl1@stanford.edu.
2
Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Graduate Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. johnpl1@stanford.edu.
3
Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. twc@stanford.edu.
4
Veterans Administration Palo Alto Healthcare System, Palo Alto, CA, USA. twc@stanford.edu.
5
Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. twc@stanford.edu.
6
Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. twc@stanford.edu.

Abstract

A rapidly ageing population and a limited therapeutic toolbox urgently necessitate new approaches to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Brain ageing, the key risk factor for neurodegeneration, involves complex cellular and molecular processes that eventually result in cognitive decline. Although cell-intrinsic defects in neurons and glia may partially explain this decline, cell-extrinsic changes in the systemic environment, mediated by blood, have recently been shown to contribute to brain dysfunction with age. Here, we review the current understanding of how systemic factors mediate brain ageing, how these factors are regulated and how we can translate these findings into therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

PMID:
31913356
DOI:
10.1038/s41583-019-0255-9

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